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Middlesex County implemented its countywide Air Pollution Control Program on December 6, 1982. 

The Middlesex County Environmental Health Division (MCEHD) administers an Air Pollution Control Program pursuant to authority from the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) and the County Environmental Health Act (CEHA) – NJSA 26:3A2-21et seq. 
 
 ​In recognition of the critical need to provide the most stringent enforcement of appropriate air pollution control practices and reacting to the increased level of concern and public awareness over air pollution and its adverse impact on the area, Middlesex County implemented its countywide Air Pollution Control Program on December 6, 1982.
 
One of the Air Pollution Control Program’s priorities is to investigate citizen complaints which include open burning, odors, smoke, idling vehicles, and particulate emissions, and to curtail, prevent or otherwise control atmospheric pollution adversely impacting the complainants.  Air Pollution, as defined by the NJDEP (NJAC 7:27-5.1), means “the presence in the outdoor atmosphere of one or more air contaminants in such quantities and duration as are, or tend to be, injurious to human health or welfare, animal or plant life or property, or would unreasonably interfere with the enjoyment of life or property throughout the State and in such territories of the State as shall be affected thereby and excludes all aspects of employer-employee relationship as to health and safety hazards.”
 
The Air Pollution Control Code for the State of New Jersey, Chapter 27, Bureau of Air Pollution Control, that was adopted by the NJDEP pursuant to authority delegated at NJSA 26:2C-1 et seq. and NJSA 26:2D-1 et seq.  Inspections focus on equipment and manufacturing devices covered specifically under NJAC 7:27-8.1 et seq.
 
Air Pollution Control Program personnel perform inspections at dry cleaning facilities to determine compliance with the NJDEP Air Pollution Control Code.  Dry cleaners utilize the cleaning solvent Perchloroethylene, which is listed as a toxic substance and regulated by the NJDEP under NJAC 7:27-17.1 et seq.  Inspections of the dry cleaning equipment are performed to insure that all gaskets and seals are properly fitted and the refrigeration, distillation, recovery, and control equipment is functioning properly and in accordance with the required NJDEP Permit to Install and Certificate to Operate.
 
Non-Hap VOC and Perchloroethylene dry cleaning facilities are inspected to insure the equipment is functioning properly and in accordance with the required NJDEP Permit to Install and Certificate to Operate. During the inspection each facility must provide records and receipts to prove: the facility doesn’t exceed the limit of solvent used that the permit allows and where the facilities waste is being taken. The inspection insures that all gaskets and seals are properly fitted and the refrigeration, distillation, recovery and control equipment is functioning properly and in accordance with the NJDEP permit and certificate.  
 
Fuel burning equipment such as boilers, heaters, and emergency generators that burn natural gas, propane, kerosene, diesel or #2 fuel oil that are fired at maximum input equal to and/or at greater than one million btu/hr are inspected to ensure facilities are in compliance with their NJDEP Permit to Install and Certificate to operate. Model numbers, serial numbers, fuel type, and permit options are verified and recorded to ensure old equipment hasn’t been removed and replaced with new equipment without the first obtaining a new NJDEP Permit. Certain records are checked and recorded determined by the permits option and the type of permit each individual facility holds.
 
Auto body shops are inspected to make sure each shop is licensed, and whether or not the facility applies paint coatings at a rate equal to or greater than ½ gallon/hr. If the shop applies paint greater than the ½ gallon/hr rate the facility must present VOC content information, type of spray guns used and how they are cleaned. Records or where the waste is being taken and handling and transfer procedures are kept on site. All materials must be stored in nonabsorbent, non-leaking containers that must be kept closed unless being filled or emptied.
 
 
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